Archive for the ‘Publications’ Category

Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of noninvasive reconstructions of epicardial potentials, electrograms, activation and recovery isochrones, and beat origins by simultaneously performing electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) and invasive epicardial electrography in intact animals. Background Noninvasive imaging of electrical potentials at the epicardium, known as ECGI, is increasingly applied in patients   Read More …

The inverse problem of electrocardiography aims at noninvasively reconstructing electrical activity of the heart from recorded body-surface electrocardiograms. A crucial step is regularization, which deals with ill-posedness of the problem by imposing constraints on the possible solutions. We developed a regularization method that includes electrophysiological input. Body-surface potentials are recorded and a computed tomography scan   Read More …

Electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) reconstructs epicardial potentials and electrograms from body-surface electrocardiograms and a torso-heart geometry. For clinical purposes, local activation and recovery times are often more useful than epicardial electrograms. However, noise and fractionation can affect estimation of activation and recovery times from reconstructed electrograms. Here, we employ a method for activation and recovery time   Read More …

Noninvasive imaging of electrical activity of the heart has increasingly gained attention over the last decades. Epicardial potentials can be reconstructed from a torso-heart geometry and body-surface potentials recorded from tens to hundreds of body-surface electrodes. However, it remains an open question how many body-surface electrodes are needed to accurately reconstruct epicardial potentials. We investigated   Read More …

Recently, we have published a review about noninvasive reconstruction of cardiac electrical activity. In this review, we aim at providing both an overview of the technical background and clinical application of a broad range of noninvasive inverse imaging techniques. Cluitmans MJ, Peeters RL, Westra RL, Volders PG. Noninvasive reconstruction of cardiac electrical activity: update on current   Read More …

In this research, we have improved our method to noninvasively reconstruct electrical heart activity by using physiology-inspired building blocks and directly reconstructing the heart’s activity in terms of those building blocks. This method was validated with unique in vivo data. Find the (award winning) paper here, and don’t hesitate to contact us with your ideas and   Read More …

At the Computing in Cardiology conference, we presented two ideas that seem to improve the inverse reconstruction of electrical heart activity. In the first, we propose to use a (computer generated) training set of realistic heart activity as building blocks for reconstructed electrograms at the heart surface. The second idea is to improve inversely reconstructed   Read More …

We are developing a new technique to reconstruct electrical heart activity by exploiting characteristics of so-called ‘wavelets’. The idea is that by representing the epicardial potentials by wavelets, we can take advantage of sparsity and achieve results that are less influenced by noise. Find the corresponding conference paper here and the poster below. Reference: Matthijs Cluitmans, Joel Karel,   Read More …

One of the major issues in the inverse problem of electrocardiography is the sensitivity to noise (or in mathematically more correct terms, the ill-posedness of the problem). In general, research teams add constraints to the possible solutions to reduce the sensitivity to noise. These constrains are mainly based on physical or mathematical characteristics of the   Read More …

I graduated on the Master “Operations Research” with the thesis titled “Non-invasive reconstruction of electrical heart activity”. This thesis handles the mathematical problem of reconstructing heart-surface potentials from body-surface potentials. We will see that this so called “inverse problem” is ill-posed, meaning that we need additional techniques to dampen the influence of noise in our   Read More …

Categories: Publications